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ErdmanAG_TimmTW

Research Abstracts Online
January 2009 - March 2010

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University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Institute of Technology
Department of Mechanical Engineering

PI: Arthur G. Erdman
Co-PI: Gerald W. Timm

Subject-specific Pelvic Modeling for Female Stress Urinary Incontinence

The objective of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing the subject-specific pelvic modeling technique to develop a clinical profile of incontinence and continence in females. The central hypothesis behind the research is that some specific anatomical parameters and their dynamic behavior are strongly associated with female stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and can be summarized into an incontinence and continence profile to predict SUI in females. The primary hypothesis is that female SUI is strongly associated with some specific anatomical parameters and their dynamic behaviors. The second hypothesis is that specific anatomical parameters and their dynamic behavior that are associated with SUI can be summarized into an incontinence and continence profile to predict SUI in females.  

There are three specific aims to this project: develop anatomical MR images database of the pelvis in both continent and incontinent women; create a subject-specific pelvic model for both continent and incontinent female subjects; and correlate measurements of parameters on anatomical MR images and subject-specific pelvic modeling with presence of incontinence in females and develop a clinical profile of incontinence and continence. Specific SUI related parameters measured on anatomical MR images, measurements of organ thickening and displacement observable on the subject-specific pelvic models will be correlated with the presence of incontinence in females to generate a profile of incontinence and continence in females.

The profile may serve as a basis to create a new standard of female SUI in future clinical studies, which could be used to predict incontinence status and plan a treatment program for a specific patient. Successful accomplishment of these aims will demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing the combined procedure to develop the profile of incontinence and continence in females.

Group Members

Prashanth Balasubramanian, Graduate Student
Nathan R. Handel, Graduate Student
Eric P. Jerke, Graduate Student
Seoggwan Kim, Research Associate
Andrew Schieber, Graduate Student
Yingchun Zhang, Research Associate